Torrington Parkinsons Support Group

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Tuesday26 March 2019

Saturday, January 26, 2019 Monthly meeting: Andrea Kliss of APDA will talk about what's available for people with movement disorders at the Hartford Health Care Vernon Center and how to avail ourselves of their services. 10am to noon at the Sullivan Senior Center, 88 East Albert St., Torrington, CT. All are welcome to attend.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 Fundraiser for TAPSG at Brandywine Living, 19 Constitution Way, Litchfield, CT featuring a sampling of international foods prepared by their chefs. Raffle prizes will be available. Proceeds will benefit the TAPSG exercise program. More information to come.

Saturday, February 23, 2019 Monthly meeting. 10am to noon at Sullivan Senior Center, 88 East Albert St., Torrington, CT. Topic to be announced.

Sunday, September 15, 2019. Walk in the Woods for Parkinson's at White Memorial, Litchfield, CT. More information to come.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

 

Parkinson's disease (also known as Parkinson disease, Parkinson's, idiopathic parkinsonism, primary parkinsonism, PD, or paralysis agitans) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. It results from the death of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain; the cause of cell-death is unknown. Early in the course of the disease, the most obvious symptoms are movement-related, including shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with walking and gait. Later, cognitive and behavioural problems may arise, with dementia commonly occurring in the advanced stages of the disease. Other symptoms include sensory, sleep and emotional problems. PD is more common in the elderly with most cases occurring after the age of 50.

(NaturalNews) The national Neuroscience 2008 conference is underway in Washington, D.C., presenting cutting edge research on the whole spectrum of diseases impacting the brain and nervous system. Breaking news from Johns Hopkins scientists presented at the meeting suggests several natural substances could be effective in treating or preventing some of these ills. Specifically, curry spice may protect the brain from Parkinson's disease (PD) and plain table grapes appear to reduce arthritis pain and inflammation.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009 by: Elizabeth Walling:

(NaturalNews) When experts discovered that Parkinson`s patients have a defect involving the production of energy in the mitochondria, eyes turned to Co-Enzyme Q10, which is a key nutrient for producing energy in the mitochondria. While studies from the last decade are far from conclusive, many still hope that CoQ10 holds an answer for a cure for Parkinson`s.

November 14th, 2012
08:16 AM ET
Parkinson's didn't stop his space walk

GO TO WEBSITE FOR FULL ARTICLE -VIDEO-COMMENTS


cnn_logoEditor's note: In the Human Factor, we profile survivors who have overcome the odds. Confronting a life obstacle – injury, illness or other hardship – they tapped their inner strength and found resilience they didn't know they possessed. As a teenager Rich Clifford dreamed of being an astronaut. After a successful career in the army, his dream of traveling into space came true. Then he was diagnosed with a serious brain disorder - a secret he kept for 15 years.

It had been a little more than four months since completing my second space shuttle mission, STS-59, on the shuttle Endeavour.

I was finishing my annual flight physical at the Johnson Space Center Flight Medicine Clinic. The words from the flight surgeon were as expected: I was in great condition with nothing of note. Then I asked the doctor to look at my right shoulder because my racketball game was suffering.

He asked if I had pain. I told him I wasn't in pain, but my right arm did not swing naturally when I walked. This comment must have set off some alarm because he observed my walk down the hall and quickly said he would take me downtown to the Texas Medical Center the next day.

I remember saying, “I don’t believe we can see an orthopedic surgeon that quickly.” He merely noted that we were going to a neurologist.

Little did I know that next day would change my life so quickly. The neurologist spent 5 minutes with me before saying that I had Parkinson’s Disease. He added I would have to undergo several separate tests to prove that I didn’t have some other neurological disorder. Parkinson’s Disease is diagnosed by the process of eliminating other possible diseases.

After several tests the diagnosis was confirmed. This was December 1995.

To their credit, the flight surgeons asked me what I wanted to do about flying. I quickly said I wanted to continue with all activities, including standing in line for another space shuttle mission. I kept my condition a secret to all, except my wife and my children. I assumed senior NASA management were told, but no one ever spoke to me about the disease. They protected my privacy.

I continued my normal duties and was subsequently offered my third shuttle mission – STS-76, which included a planned space walk. The mission was highly successful. One year after that mission, I left NASA for a job in the private sector supporting human space flight.

With the exception of my closest friends and family, I kept my condition a secret for almost 15 years. My reason for secrecy was simple: People did not need to know.

Now I'm an advocate for Parkinson’s Disease awareness. Having Parkinson’s Disease is no reason to stop living life to its fullest extent. Yes, as the disease progresses I have had to change the way I do certain activities, but I continue to do them.

I have a keen awareness now of the stress my disease places on my loved ones who provide me encouragement and tender-loving care. The caregivers to a person with Parkinson’s are the people who give so much of their lives to care for a loved one. My wife is my caregiver and I am acutely aware of her sacrifices. Parkinson’s disease affects more than just the patient. The patient needs to understand the caregiver is there to help.

So do not let Parkinson’s Disease control your life. You may do things slower, or you may not be able to do things you once did as easily. It is not the end of the world. Do not give up trying. Post by: Rich Clifford - Special to CNN
Filed under: Human Factor • Parkinson's disease

Greater Torrington Area Parkinsons Support GroupThe Mission of the Torrington Area Parkinson’s Support Group is to maximize strength, minimize disability and achieve and maintain full potential of people with Parkinson’s and their caretakers.